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Professor Tristan Perez

Robotics & Autonomous Systems
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Queensland University of Technology
S1109/S-Block Level 11
2 George St GPO Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4001, Australia
ph: +61 7 3138 9076
email: tristan.perez@qut.edu.au

News

  • Today
    • Recruiting PhD students Now - see current research below
  • 8/5/2014: Aggressive bees project in collaboration with UQ kicks off.

Bio

Tristan Perez completed his Electronics Engineering degree (a 6-year program) at the National University of Rosario in Argentina in 1999 and his PhD in the area of control Engineering at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2003.

In 2004, he moved to the UK and took a position as a Research Fellow at the Mechatronics Centre of the University of Wales, Newport, where he worked on fault diagnosis and control of propulsion systems for underwater vehicles – a collaboration with Seaeye Marine (SAAB).

In July 2004, Tristan moved to Norway, where he spent three and a half years at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). He was a Senior Research Fellow at the CoE for Ships of Ocean Structures (CeSOS). At CeSOS, he conducted research on mathematical modelling of ship dynamics for manoeuvring in a seaway, ship roll stabilisation, and control allocation for ship dynamic positioning. Tristan was also a lecturer in marine control systems.

In 2007, he moved back to Australia to the ARC-CoE for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control (CDSC) at the University of Newcastle (UoN). At CDSC, he developed a research program on dynamics and motion control of marine and aerospace vehicles. Within this program, he led 11 projects with 5 industry partners from Australia, New Zealand, Spain, and Norway.

In 2010, Tristan was appointed A/Prof of Mechatronics at the University of Newcastle (UoN), where he undertook the re-development of the BEng Mechatronics program and developed the laboratory for autonomous systems and robotics.

Also from 2009 to 2012, Tristan was appointed Adjoint A/Prof of Ship Dynamics at NTNU (Norway).

In April 2014, Tristan was appointed Professor of Robotics at the School of Electrical Eng. & Computer Science at QUT.

 

 


Professional Memberships and Associations
-  Member IFAC Technical Committee on Intelligent Autonomous Vehicles
 Member IFAC Technical Committee on Marine Systems
 Member IEEE Control System Society
-  Corresponding Member IEAust National Panel for Mechatronics


 


Research Interests
- Robust autonomy of field and service robots
Energy-based modelling and control physical dynamic systems

 


Current Research


 

- Lightweight unmanned ground vehicle design for broadacre agricultural applications (2014-2016)
This project seek the design and optimisation of an unmanned ground vehicle for various applications in boradacre agriculture. The UGV conduct operations of weed management, planting and fertilising. This project is part of the Queensland Centre for Agricultural Robotics at QUT.
 

Researchers:  Owen Bawden, Ray Russel, Jason Kulk, and Tristan Perez (all at RAS-QUT)

Funding: Queensland Department of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries  (DAFF-QLD)

StudentsWe are currently looking for a PhD student for this project (contact:  tristan.perez@qut.edu.au)

 


- Identification and weed destruction methods (2014-2016)
This project seek the design of novel computer vision algorithms for detection and classification of weeds in both fallow period and in crop as well as weed destruction methods. This project is part of the Queensland Centre for Agricultural Robotics at QUT.
 

Researchers:  Chris MaCool, Nico Sünderhauf, Feras Dayoub, David Hall, Ben Upcroft and Tristan Perez (all at RAS-QUT)

Funding: Queensland Department of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries  (DAFF-QLD)

 StudentsWe are currently looking for a PhD student for this project (contact:  tristan.perez@qut.edu.au)

- Manipulation of horticulture crops (2014-2016)
This project seek the design of a novel robotic manipulator and its control system for manipulation of specific horticulture crops. This project is part of the Queensland Centre for Agricultural Robotics at QUT.
 

Researchers:  Chris Lehnert and Tristan Perez (all at RAS-QUT)

Funding: Queensland Department of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries  (DAFF-QLD)

StudentsWe are currently looking for a PhD student for this project (contact:  tristan.perez@qut.edu.au)

 

- Biologically-inspired detection, pursuit and interception of moving objects by unmanned aircraft systems (2014-2016)

Although it is well known that aggressive honeybees are very effective at detecting, pursuing and intercepting moving targets, this behaviour has never been studied quantitatively. In this project, we are using high-speed video cinematography to investigate this behaviour, to develop visual algorithms for the detection of moving targets, and to create dynamical models of the mechanisms that control pursuit. The  results will be used to design novel, biologically-inspired guidance systems for unmanned aerial vehicles that are engaged in surveillance, security and safety missions. 

Researchers: Mandyam Srinivasan (Queensland Brain Institute - University of Queensland), Tristan Perez (RAS-QUT)

Funding: Australian Research Council - Discovery Project (PROJECT ID: DP140100896 )

Students: We are currently looking for a PhD student at QUT for this project (email:  tristan.perez@qut.edu.au)


- Strategies for mid-air collision avoidance in aircraft: lessons from bird flight (2014-2016) 
Mid-air collisions between aircraft are becoming increasingly likely due to the rapid proliferation of airspace complexity and the presence of unmanned aircraft in uncontrolled air spaces. Existing technologies for ‘sense and avoid’ collisions are bulky, expensive, and not 100% reliable. In this project, we will draw inspiration from Nature to seek improvements. Birds fly rapidly and safely through complex and cluttered environments and rarely collide with objects and other birds. We will study how birds use sensory information, make decisions, and perform manoeuvres, and draw inspiration from experiments on bird flight to develop and test novel strategies for the detection and avoidance of potential aircraft mid-air collisions. 

Researchers: Mandyam Srinivasan (Queensland Brain Institute - University of Queensland), Tristan Perez (RAS-QUT), Brendan Williams (Boeing Research & Technology Australia)

Funding: Australian Research Council - Linkage Project (PROJECT ID: LP130100483)

StudentsWe are currently looking for a PhD student at QUT for this project (email:  tristan.perez@qut.edu.au)



- Nonlinear State Estimation and Control of Multiple UUV’s in Close Proximity (2014)
When controlling multiple slender underwater vehicles operating in close proximity, the ability to estimate the magnitude of vehicle-to-vehicle hydrodynamic interaction forces is highly desirable. These forces, however, are discontinuous and difficult to estimate accurately. Moreover, designing a nonlinear control system to be able to take advantage of the information available from such a model is non-trivial. This project seeks to develop novels state estimation and motion control strategies that account for the vehicle-to-vehicle hydrodynamic forces.

Researchers: Prof Tristan Perez (RAS-QUT), Alejandro Donaire (The University of Newcastle), Francis Valentinis (DSTO)

Funding: Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) - through the The University of Newcastle



- Stabilisation of mechanical systems subject to nonholonomic constraints and disturbances (2013-2014)

The study of mechanical system subject to nonholonomic constraints have been developed within the realm of an- alytical mechanics. The complexity and highly nonlinear dynamics of nonholonomic-mechanical systems make the motion control problem challenging. A key feature that distinguishes the control of nonholonomic systems from that of holonomic systems in that in the former, it is not possible to stabilise an isolated equilibrium with a smooth state-feedback control law. The best one can achieve with smooth control laws is to stabilise an equilibrium manifold-this fact follows from Brockett’s necessary condition. In this project, we investigate the problem of stabilisation of port-Hamiltonian mechanical systems subject to nonholonommic constraints and external disturbances using smooth control laws.


Researchers: Dr Alejandro Donaire (The University of Newcastle)Dr Jose G. Romero (CNRS–SUPELEC), Prof Romeo Ortega (CNRS–SUPELEC), Prof Tristan Perez (RAS-QUT)

Funding: This is an academic collaboration. Each researcher is supported by its own institution.


 

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